The College of Arts and Letters and the College of Engineering have partnered to offer an interdisciplinary Computing & Digital Technologies (CDT) minor that allows students to blend programming and technology skills with the liberal arts in a wide variety of ways. Students in the minor may specialize in one of the tracks below:

  • User Interface and Experience

    User Interface and Experience

    Students in this track focus on how to design technology systems to maximize the user experience. Learn more →

  • Cyber Safety and Security

    Cyber Safety and Security

    Students in this track focus on the vulnerabilities, threats, protections, investigations, and legalities associated with technology systems. Learn more →

  • Digital Arts

    Digital Arts

    Students in this track focus on the ways in which technology can assist in the creation and display of artistic expression. Learn more →

  • Technology Development<br />and Management

    Technology Development
    and Management

    Students in this track focus on the ways in which technology can implemented, managed, and maintained in organizations. Learn more →

  • User Interface and Experience
  • Cyber Safety and Security
  • Digital Arts
  • Technology Development
    and Management

The CDT minor is a blended program cutting across the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Engineering

CDT is a program intended for Arts & Letters students. As a CDT student, you will take courses in Arts & Letters and Engineering to enhance your technical skills and increase your understanding of the ways in which technology can contribute both to your personal and professional life. CDT will enrich your liberal arts education, broaden your perspective, and give you skills and experience that prospective employers will value tremendously.  

“Coding, editing video, design — it really is just the tip of the iceberg. What’s below the tip of the iceberg is participation, critical thinking and being able to collaborate. You really need to be a well-rounded, Renaissance, Internet-era kind of person.”

                                           – Mark Surman, Executive Director of the Mozilla Foundation