The College of Arts and Letters and the College of Engineering have partnered to offer an interdisciplinary Computing & Digital Technologies (CDT) minor that allows students to blend programming and technology skills with the liberal arts in a wide variety of ways. Students in the minor may specialize in one of six tracks:

  • User Interface and Experience

    User Interface and Experience

    Students in this track focus on how to design technology systems to maximize the user experience. Learn more →

  • Cyber Safety and Security

    Cyber Safety and Security

    Students in this track focus on the vulnerabilities, threats, protections, investigations, and legalities associated with technology systems. Learn more →

  • Digital Humanities

    Digital Humanities

    Students in this track focus on the ways in which technology can assist in the analysis and understanding of literature and textual information. Learn more →

  • Digital Arts

    Digital Arts

    Students in this track focus on the ways in which technology can assist in the creation and display of artistic expression. Learn more →

  • Cognitive Science

    Cognitive Science

    Students in this track focus on how technology is relevant to scientific investigation in the field of cognitive science. Learn more →

  • Technology Development<br />and Management

    Technology Development
    and Management

    Students in this track focus on the ways in which technology can implemented, managed, and maintained in organizations. Learn more →

  • Non-AL Students

    Non-AL Students

    The Dean's Office in the College of Arts & Letters understands that CDT is an attractive program for many students outside the College. However, limited resources and high student demand within the College means that CDT cannot be opened to every undergraduate in the University. Nonetheless, the College will consider program admission once each year for non-AL students on a limited and competitive basis. Admission of non-AL students each year will depend on current program size and other considerations. In some years, no admissions of non-AL students may be possible.  

    How to Apply

    An application form is available here for non-AL students to complete. This completed appication should be submitted to the CDT program director, Prof. Crowell (ccrowell@nd.edu), via email as an attachment.  Applications for program enrollment in the next year should be submitted no later than in the Spring semester of the preceeding year prior to semester break. The program director will review all new applications each Spring and make any admissions that are possible and warranted based on application materials. Among the considerations that will influence a decision to admit a non-AL applicant to CDT will be factors such as the applicant's current college and program of study, the case made in the application for how CDT complements a student's major(s) and career goals, as well as the quality of the students performance record thus far at Notre Dame.

    How to Take CDT Classes

    Students should note that it may be possible to enroll in certain CDT classes even without being a program student.  The CDT office (Claire Shely) maintains a waiting list each semester for CDT classes.  If seats remain in those classes late in the registration cycle after CDT students have registered, seats may be opened to those on this waiting list. Of course, preference is given to any CDT students on the list, but non-CDT students can be and have been granted permission to enroll.

  • User Interface and Experience
  • Cyber Safety and Security
  • Digital Humanities
  • Digital Arts
  • Cognitive Science
  • Technology Development
    and Management
  • Non-AL Students

The CDT minor is a blended program cutting across the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Engineering

CDT is a program intended for Arts & Letters students. As a CDT student, you will take courses in Arts & Letters and Engineering to enhance your technical skills and increase your understanding of the ways in which technology can contribute both to your personal and professional life. CDT will enrich your liberal arts education, broaden your perspective, and give you skills and experience that prospective employers will value tremendously.  

“Coding, editing video, design — it really is just the tip of the iceberg. What’s below the tip of the iceberg is participation, critical thinking and being able to collaborate. You really need to be a well-rounded, Renaissance, Internet-era kind of person.”

                                           – Mark Surman, Executive Director of the Mozilla Foundation